Monthly Archives: December 2013

Amóvil accessible mobile search assistant

Amóvil helps you identify mobile devices that accommodate your personal preferences by selecting your profile.

Amóvil will help you identify mobile devices that best suit your needs and preferences. To begin searching, you need to select your profile and the features that best accommodate your specific needs. If a matching device is found, a list of compatible assistive technology and web-based applications will be provided in order to improve your user experience.

Amóvil online self-training course on how to test a mobile device for accessibility compliance

The Amóvil website, in collaboration with the Vodafone Spain Foundation, has made available a free online self-training course to help users learn how to test a mobile device for accessibility compliance.

The course provides a set of guidelines that are based on the principles of Universal Accessibility and Design for All. These guidelines describe the requirements mobile devices must comply with in order to be accessible to persons with disabilities. In addition, descriptions of each disability profiles as well as the barriers these users tend to face when dealing with technology are provided.

This course, which is available at Amóvil blog site, aims to be a comprehensive introduction to inclusive mobile design. It is also intended to encourage developers to keep disabled and elderly people in mind when designing mobile devices.

OpenDyslexic – Free and Open Source Dyslexia Typeface

A free-to-use font designed to help people with dyslexia is gaining favour.

A B and C from the OpenDyslexic font - designed to give 'gravity' to letters to prevent the characters rotating in readers' minds

A B and C from the OpenDyslexic font – designed to give ‘gravity’ to letters to prevent the characters rotating in readers’ minds

OpenDyslexic’s characters have been given “heavy-weighted bottoms” to prevent them from flipping and swapping around in the minds of their readers.

A recent update to the popular app Instapaper has adopted the text format as an option for its users.

The font has also been built into a word processor, an ebook reader and has been installed on school computers.

The project was created by Abelardo Gonzalez, a New Hampshire-based mobile app designer, who released his designs onto the web at the end of last year.

Source: BBC